Building a Sustainable Kid's Closet

This has been one of the most challenging parts of living a slow fashion lifestyle. It was easy enough for me to shop at thrift stores and save up to buy a few nice, quality pieces of clothing before I had my daughter. It was just me! Plus, as an adult, I tend to be more careful with my clothing and you know, eat with utensils and use napkins/ don’t crawl on the ground soooo basically, keeping clothes in fairly good shape was something I could control. Having a child on the other hand? It’s been a little more difficult to build and sustain an ethical closet but I’m here to reassure you: IT IS 1000% POSSIBLE. Here are some things that have been helping me:

1.Hand-me-downs: For the mamas on a budget (ahem, that’s me!), this is the #1 for you. I let everyone know when I was pregnant: I do not want new children’s clothes but instead, would love to help Mother Nature by reusing old, loved clothing that’s in decent shape. I took it as an opportunity to let of friends and family know just how much I love sustainability and rescuing clothing from landfill. It wasn’t necessary for every conversation but I would sometimes let people know (when I got the weird looks): really, it’s not just about saving money, we just want to feel good about the clothing we put on our daughter. Our family does our best to not contribute to the consumer mindset of needing new everything. And knowing someone else loved it first (especially when we know them!) makes the clothes so much more special!

2. Thrift stores: One of my FAVORITES is Savers (and if you’re in Las Vegas, the one on Eastern and Tropicana always has great stuff)! Their clothes are extremely affordable and in great shape. I typically spend $2-3 per garment.

3. Kid’s resale or consignment shops: These are literally thrift shops just for children’s clothing, shoes and toys. My absolute favorite here in Vegas is Archer and Jane. A curated selection of vintage and used, and even some maternity. I’ve scored the most beautiful clothing here for $3-10 dollars a piece. I highly, highly recommend it!

4. Ethical children’s clothing companies do exist! Here are my favorites- quality, affordable and all run by female entrepreneurs:

Found Path Goods: High quality handmade line of children’s clothing (and clothes for mom!), Found Path creates timeless designs out of premium linen inspired by a natural color palette. Small business owned by a momma of two here in Las Vegas.

 Image from Found Path

Image from Found Path

Little Cloth Revival: This shop just launched THIS WEEK and I am so excited about it! Little Cloth Revival uses thrifted clothing to make timeless children’s pieces, saving donated clothing from landfills and repurposing them into quality, handmade pieces, built to last. Small business owned by a momma of two in Central California. Use code: SisterHouseCo for free shipping on any order!

 Image from Little Cloth Revival

Image from Little Cloth Revival

Beru Kids: Made in LA, utilizing “dead stock” fabrics (rescued scraps from other companies that would be thrown away) + organic knits. Beru has strong ethics in terms of livable wages for employees and environmental responsibility. Use code: BERUCREW4LIFE to save 20% when you order!

 Image from Beru Kids

Image from Beru Kids

One final thought: I often let people know when buying for myself or for baby, that ethics in the clothing industry is something I am insanely passionate about. If you are like me and are heavily invested in supporting ethics in the clothing manufacturing realm, use conversations about your reasoning for the way the way you shop as an opportunity to educate. Most people have no idea how exploitative the clothing industry is. I often give a digestible amount of information and let whoever I’m talking to know if they want to learn more, I’m happy to share. Fighting fast fashion and cheaply produced clothing has become one of my main callings in life- which is why I give a lot of thought to the things our family consumes. New mamas: you will still get new clothes at your baby shower, and probably as gifts throughout your child’s life and that is okay. Just taking steps toward the slow fashion movement and ethical approach yourself will inspire those around you to ask why you’re choosing not to hit that Target or Carter’s baby sale or why you choose to shop the way you do. Use it as an opportunity to pass along the gift of education and awareness. If you are interested in slow fashion at all, you likely have a wealth of knowledge to share!

 

 

LifestyleAshley Ayala